regarding artistic integrity

One thing I’ve learned over the past couple years, and something I’m constantly reminding myself of, is that I absolutely cannot give up my artistic integrity.  Easier said than done, especially in a bad economy and with student loans to pay.  Even though my photography isn’t financially lucrative for me, I haven’t caved in to what others expect or want of me.

I say this now, because yesterday I had an interview to be the studio manager for a photographer here in Columbus.  It was one of the most comically horrible interviews of my life.  I knew going in that our styles didn’t mesh, but I wanted to give it a try anyway.  This photographer was one of the most arrogant and offensive men I’ve encountered in this field.  Within our 15-minute chat, he managed to condescend me, make fun of RISD (which you just don’t do to a RISD grad!), trash talk all fine art photography, and tell me it would be impossible for me to find paying editorial jobs with my kind of work.  I left the interview literally laughing to myself and feeling better about who I am and what my work is than I have in a long time.  This guy (who must run all of his photos through at least 35 Photoshop filters to achieve his “style”) thought he was doing me a favor by letting me know what I was doing wrong and what he was doing right to “make it” in this industry.  But instead, he made me realize that I’m so happy I’m not anywhere near his convoluted photo world.

I don’t usually like to use my blog as a verbal venting forum.  But, I want to stress the fact that maintaining personal and artistic (hopefully those two are linked) integrity is so  important in this world.  My work means more to me than the monetary value it rakes in, and I refuse to let anyone make me feel bad about that.  I’m not in this for fame and fortune.  I’d much prefer to continue to work various restaurant or office jobs to fund my photography than work for a person who wants to strip me of my vision and ideals.

Thus ends this rant.  :)

Sarah